Video: The Highway Series, Fender's Newest Acoustic-Electric Hybrids

Striking a bold new middleground between electric and acoustic guitars has become something of an obsession at Fender in recent years.

Its latest? The Highway Series, which at launch includes a non-traditional Dreadnought and Parlor model. Both have thin, comfortable bodies that somehow still resonate like much larger guitars and a refined Fishman Fluence pickup system that creates a pure and musical amplified sound, without feedback.


Fender Highway Series Lineup

Following the vast sonic options of the Acoustasonic series, the Highways are more straightforward instruments.

The Fishman Fluence Acoustic Pickup system found in both the Dreadnought and Parlor guitars is high-tech, featuring the programmed Fluence Core architecture and a curved magnet. The combination offers a clear, detailed sound, but stops short of the body shape impulse-response options found among the Acoustasonic line.

Key features and specs of the Highway Dreadnought include:

  • Solid Sitka Spruce body,
  • Chambered Mahogany back and sides
  • Tapered Floating X bracing
  • Mahogany, "C" Shape neck
  • 25.5" scale length
  • Graph Tech TUSQ, 1.6875” (42.86 mm) nut
  • Modern Viking bridge
  • Available in natural or all-mahogany finish

Key features and specs of the Highway Parlor include:

  • Solid Sitka Spruce body,
  • Chambered Mahogany back and sides
  • Tapered Floating X bracing
  • Mahogany, "C" Shape neck
  • 24.75" scale length
  • Graph Tech TUSQ, 1.6875” (42.86 mm) nut
  • Modern Viking bridge

Find both the Highway Dreadnought and Highway Parlor guitars on Reverb right now.

"This article is part of a paid partnership with Fender. From time to time, Reverb partners with trusted brands and manufacturers to highlight some of our favourite products we think our community will love."
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