Reverb Recommends


Reverb Recommends

The world of music gear is so vast that instruments and items exist for just about any purpose. With so many choices available, however, it can be difficult to find the best option for everyday use. On this page, we've pulled together some of our picks from various categories to highlight the very best gear you'll find anywhere. Click the read more buttons in each section for more recommendations.

The world of music gear is so vast that instruments and items exist for just about any purpose. With so many choices available, however, it can be difficult to find the best option for everyday use. On this page, we've pulled together some of our picks from various categories to highlight the very best gear you'll find anywhere. Click the read more buttons in each section for more recommendations.

Best Loop Pedals Under $150

Loop pedals, also known as looping stations or loopers, allow a single player to record an exact replica of their instrument within a given space of time to be played back with the tap of a foot. The first looping pedal is an enormous graduation step for any developing musician. Guitars, basses, keyboards: If an instrument is electronic, its possibilities are multiplied when a looper is brought into play. So how do you use a looper? Looper functions are divided into three main parts: record, overdub, and play. Recording typically involves a button or footswitch: Press the button to begin recording, press it again to stop. Overdubs allow for additional parts to be layered on top of an existing recording, and finally, hitting play sets your loop live. Want a rhythm section to practice your soloing? Done. Prefer some ambient noise to complement a track? No problem.

Today we’re looking at the best entries into that world for beginners to familiarize themselves with and get a firm grip on looping. While lacking some features of more elaborate loop stations, all these options are great starting points and all come in at under the $150 price point.

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Best Large Diaphragm Condenser Microphones Under $300

We at Reverb have collectively had an opportunity to try pretty much every single affordable condenser microphone currently manufactured on a number of sound sources. The list below will take you through some of the best large diaphragm condenser microphones for beginners and outline the specifics offerings of each. In this particular guide, we’ll stick to cardioid-only microphones with FET electronics. There are a handful of multi-pattern and tube mics in this price range, but in the interest of comparing apples to apples, we’ll stick with one family of microphone.

We at Reverb have collectively had an opportunity to try pretty much every single affordable condenser microphone currently manufactured on a number of sound sources. The list below will take you through some of the best large diaphragm condenser microphones for beginners and outline the specifics offerings of each.

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Best Delay Pedals for Under $200

From iconic ‘50s slapback to the trailing decay of spacey experimental bands, delay has become a staple on most musicians’ pedalboards. Even if you’re not after endless repeats or cavernous echoes, basic delay can give an otherwise dry note a little something extra. And like reverb, delay is fantastic for adding some depth and dimension to your sound. Your typical delay pedal will give you control over a few basic settings like repeats, delay time, and feedback, the latter of which will help send your pedal reeling into the realm of self-oscillation. Many pedals also have onboard tap tempo, which you can use to actually plan out the exact timing of repeats.

So if you’re on a quest to find the best delay around, this guide will help you investigate some of the best delay pedals to be had for under $200, venturing from the meat-and-potatoes effects into stranger territory and back.

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Best Beginner Bass Guitars Under $400

So you need a bass guitar. Maybe you were inspired by our recent video of Michael League (from Snarky Puppy) getting funky and far out. Maybe you’re sick of being the second or third guitarist in a band. Maybe you’re thirteen. Whatever the case, you’re probably not looking to spend an entire paycheck or go into serious debt just to feel the floor rumble as you groove. And you don’t have to. That cocktail of cool, playable and affordable applies to a surprising number of basses, both used and new. Whether you play them as they came from the factory or decide to mod them out, these five get our nod as the best beginner bass guitars.

To make your life easier, we distilled out a list of gear snob-approved models from the hundreds of bass guitars that pass through Reverb each week. Our criteria: 1) Under $400. 2) Doesn’t feel like a toy. 3) Makes you want to play more.

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The Best Fuzz Pedals You Might Not Know About

While much has been written describing the subtle differences of the classic fuzz pedals -- your Fuzz Faces, Fuzz-Tones, Tone Benders and Big Muffs of the world -- today we thought we'd take a look at some of the very best modern boutique fuzz pedals currently on the market. All these pedals take the fundamental fuzz sound that's been heard on records from Satisfaction to the Smashing Pumpkins to St. Vincent, the Black Keys and beyond, and give it a little spin. In this roundup, we're focusing on some lesser-known options, but there are plenty of other modern classic boutique fuzzes that are worthy of consideration.

In this roundup, we're focusing on some lesser-known options, but there are plenty of other modern classic boutique fuzzes that are worthy of consideration. These include the Zvex Fuzz Factory, the Death By Audio Fuzz War, and the EarthQuaker Devices Hoof (and its variations) among many others.

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Best Reverb Pedals Under $150

Reverb may be the most commonly used audio effect in the world, and this certainly holds true in the world of guitar effects. Reverb can do everything from adding a little space and depth to your sound, to forging enveloping soundscapes that dominate a mix when exploring more out-there settings. Regardless of how you intend to use it, every pedalboard should have a reverb on it somewhere. If you're new to the world of effects, there are many factors to weigh when comparing reverb pedals. Different models have different modes which emulate various analog reverb styles such as "hall" or "spring". Beyond these modes, there are varying control configurations to consider, and that's not to mention the subjective quality of the tone each pedal produces. It can be a lot to decipher but to help you on your way we've put together this handy guide to some of our favorite reverb pedals that can be had for under $150.

If you're new to the world of effects, there are many factors to weigh when comparing reverb pedals. It can be a lot to decipher but to help you on your way we've put together this handy guide to some of our favorite reverb pedals that can be had for under $150.

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Best Acoustic Guitars for Beginners

Your first acoustic guitar can be a big purchase. With prices ranging from under $100 to up in the thousands, the world of acoustics and what dictates their price may seem more than a little foreign. After all, there are body shapes to consider, tonewoods to take into account, and even the nylon vs. steel-string debate to throw a wrench in your planning. That being said, for beginners looking to play pop, rock, country and other acoustic styles, a classic steel-string dreadnought acoustic is the most popular choice. Although there are smaller body types, like concert acoustics, and larger, like the jumbo, the dreadnought is what most people think when they think "acoustic guitar" and probably the most versatile option out there. In this article, we’re going to take a look at a few stellar steel-string dreadnought options and even throw in a travel-sized model to give you plenty of options to choose from when shopping for your first acoustic guitar.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at a few stellar steel-string dreadnought options and even throw in a travel-sized model to give you plenty of options to choose from when shopping for your first acoustic guitar. All of these come in at totally reasonable price points which make them great options for players who are just getting started.

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Best USB Microphones for Podcasting

USB microphones provide one of the easiest routes to graduate from your computer's onboard mic to something with better sound quality. Many musicians use USB microphones for at-home demoing, and more and more, these devices are being deployed in the world of podcasting. And this usage makes perfect sense: USB microphones take the standalone audio interface out of the equation for a one-and-done solution that takes up less space and is even easier to configure. The result is a plug-and-play setup that brings better, clearer sound to your podcast and eliminates the risk of warding off listeners with inaudible talking and random noises on your latest episode. There are a few things to keep in mind when looking for a suitable USB microphone. Some are simply based on personal preference, like frequency response, while others are just more likely to yield higher quality sound nine times out of ten. For instance, getting a cardioid microphone, which picks up sound from only one specific direction and rejects all other sound, will probably make for better sound than, say, an omnidirectional mic, which picks up sound from all directions and will almost certainly mar the quality of your sound.

If you’re just getting into podcasting and all of this seems a little overwhelming, don’t worry—we’ve got you covered with this nifty guide to the five best USB microphones you can pick up for all of your podcasting needs.

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Best Guitar Humidifiers

A good humidifier is an essential purchase for anyone who wants to keep their guitar in tip-top shape. While it may seem like a dry subject (pun intended), anyone who’s left their acoustic in less than savory climate conditions can tell you what havoc leaving your instrument un-humidified will wreak: warped necks, buzzy frets, horrifying cracks, the works. Sometimes the damage is irreparable. This can be particularly important to keep in mind during the colder months, when heating systems dry out homes and, consequently, your stringed instruments. Unlike other accessories you can buy for your guitar, there are many different types of humidifiers to consider, but they all seek to accomplish the same thing: keep the wood in your instrument properly humid and happy. You can use a hydrometer to measure the humidity of a room or space, which should ideally be kept between 40% and 50%. There are even some nifty in-case sensors out there that will tell you what the humidity is like inside of your guitar case.

If you want to make sure your instrument stays humidified and healthy with some top-of-the-line options, read on to see our primary choices in this guitar humidifier buying guide.

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