Eurorack format synths were designed to allow synth makers to bring modern technology to the experimental formats of earlier synths. In the early days of synthesis, as the wires of oscillators and filters were first woven into musical instruments by pioneers like Bob Moog and Don Buchla, all synthesizers were modular. Built on handmade discrete circuits, these devices were large systems by necessity. As the technology advanced and their popularity grew, synths became fixed devices that were more portable and reliable, but lacked the flexibility of earlier designs. In 1995, Dieter Doepfer debuted the Eurorack format for synth modules, allowing builders to bring modern technology to bear on a system that captured the exploratory spirit of earlier years. Steadily gaining traction over a decade to become the most popular format for modular synthesis, in recent years the Eurorack market has exploded, with DIY makers, boutique builders and top manufacturers like Roland and Moog all getting into the game. From vintage analog recreations to futuristic digital experiments, the Eurorack format allows you to mix-and-match modules to build a custom synth that's as unique as you.