Just call the Neumann KM 184 "the" acoustic guitar mic. Its incredibly natural sound is also ideal for capturing strings, winds, or delicate percussion.

The Essential Small-Diaphragm Condenser Microphone
The Neumann KM 184 cardioid small-diaphragm condenser microphone has been heralded as one of the best tools for recording acoustic guitar -- and you'll find that the applications of this mic are virtually limitless. A wide frequency response and high maximum SPL gives you incredibly clear, accurate capture. Transformerless circuitry allows for impressively low self-noise of 13 dB, and the pressure-gradient transducer provides smooth frequency response both on- and off-axis. Neumann needs no introduction -- its name and reputation speaks for itself as a world leader in recording gear, and once you track your first session with a pair of KM 184s, you'll know why.

A Successor to the KM84
Neumann's KM 84 quickly became renowned for its amazingly transparent capture and small size. In fact, KM stands for Kleine Mikrofon, which translates to "small microphone" in English. Your KM184 follows as a successor of this small condenser mic with a slightly different back plate design. Instead of using blind and through-holes, the KM 184's back plate is carved with a sequence of slits to control the diaphragm's resonance and dampening. This method was found to be acoustically superior, leading to greater directionality and a more linear quality to the mic's capsule. This is where the term "crossed-slit" capsule came from.

Smooth Frequency Response for Accurate Capture
Your KM184 has a remarkably smooth frequency response, which gives you an impressively transparent capture and reproduction. The low end begins to slowly come down starting at around 200 Hz, and then hits around -12 dB at 20 Hz. There is a slight boost at around 8 or 9 kHz to give the captured audio a pleasant yet subtle airiness to brighten things up a bit. Aside from that, the frequency response is very flat, giving you a natural reproduction of the instrument, which, in playback, comes close as possible to the actual performance itself. You'll get smooth frequency response for both 0-degree on-axis and lateral off-axis microphone placements -- try a pair of KM 184s set up in an X/Y stereo configuration or wide ORTF pattern.

The Do-Everything Pencil Condenser
This classic mic works exceptionally well for tracking acoustic guitars, but you can use it anywhere you'd use a pencil mic. A high maximum SPL of 138 dB makes a pair of KM 184s a great choice for drum overheads. You can also place this mic right above your kick drum somewhat close to your snare, right in the middle of the kit to get a nice and surprisingly complete drum sound from a single mic.

Accessories Included
Your Neumann KM 184 pair comes with a pop filter and a mic clip to get you recording right away. Also included is a wooden storage case that looks classy, while keeping these unparalleled tools-of-tone safe and secure when not in use.

Features:
- Small-diaphragm condenser microphone -- successor of the renowned KM 84
- Transformerless circuitry
- Cardioid polar pattern
- Pressure-gradient transducer
- Frequency response of 20 Hz to 20 kHz
- Maximum SPL of 138 dB
- Output impedance of 50 ohms
- Low self-noise of 13 dB
- XLR output
- Wooden case, pop filter, and mic clip included

zZounds is an authorized dealer of Neumann products.

ConditionBrand New (New)
Brand New items are sold by an authorized dealer or original builder and include all original packaging.learn more
Brand
Model
  • KM 184 mt Small Diaphragm Cardioid Condenser Microphone
Categories
Microphone Type
  • Small-Diaphragm Condenser
Wired/Wireless
  • Wired
Electronics
  • Analog
  • Solid State
Polar Pattern
  • Cardioid

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