Leo Master Soprano Ukulele (1950s), probably Chicago, natural lacquer finish, flamed mahogany body, mahogany neck, original brown canvas gig bag case. This is a well made "Jobber brand' ukulele from the 1950s, featuring some particularly nicely grained mahogany on the body. The brand on the headstock is "Leo Master" which despite some folks hopeful suppositions has nothing to do with Leo Fender! Harmony is often credited as the primary supplier of this brand, but this instrument does not look like their more common work; if so it is on the top end of their quality scale! It is generally modeled after the Martin Style 0 but with a larger soundhole and bridge. Wherever it came from this is a very nice sounding and playing uke, a cut above the average jobber instrument from this era.Overall length is 20 3/4 in. (52.7 cm.), 6 5/16 in. (16 cm.) wide at lower bout, and 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) in depth at side, taken at the end block. Scale length is 13 5/8 in. (346 mm.). Width of nut is 1 7/16 in. (36 mm.). This is a nice clean instrument overall, appearing not much played over the last 60 or so years. The finish has some very light wear and there is one small tight grain split on the back edge, but really it looks 6 years old more than 60+. It plays and sounds quite well and is a surprisingly high-quality instrument for its budget branding. It is complete in the original canvas gig bag. Excellent Condition.

Listed6 months ago
ConditionExcellent (Used)
Excellent items are almost entirely free from blemishes and other visual defects and have been played or used with the utmost care.learn more
Brand
Model
  • Unknown
Finish
  • Natural Lacquer
Categories
Year
  • 1950

Reverb Protection

Simple Returns, Secure Transactions, Human Support

Learn more

Secure Checkout

Retrofret Vintage Guitars

Brooklyn, NY, United States
Sales:1,077
Joined Reverb:2015

Reverb Gives

Your purchases help youth music programs get the gear they need to make music.

Carbon-Offset Shipping

Your purchases also help protect forests, including trees traditionally used to make instruments.

Oops, looks like you forgot something. Please check the fields highlighted in red.