Big MuffsBuying Guide

An overview of the many Big Muff pedals on Reverb from EHX and beyond.

The Electro-Harmonix Big Muff is undoubtedly one of the most iconic and influential guitar pedals ever made. With roots going back to the psychedelic late-'60s, the Big Muff has evolved into an entire genre of pedals. EHX makes at least a dozen variants with different shades of tone and feature sets, and that's in addition to decades' worth of vintage inventory and Big Muff-type pedals made by other companies.

If you're just getting started with fuzz and think that a Big Muff might be in your future, take a look below for our quick guide to all of the Big Muffs currently available for the guitarist and bassists of the world.


Electro-Harmonix Big Muff Pedals Currently in Production

Vintage Big Muff Pedals

What to Consider When Shopping for a Vintage Big Muff

When perusing Reverb, you’ll often see vintage Big Muff pedals, some with hefty price tags. But before jumping into the vintage Big Muff market yourself, there are a few things you should know.

What does the V mean?

Most vintage Big Muff listings will include a “V” followed by a number (i.e. V7). This nomenclature denotes the version of the pedal, which can then be pinned to a production year or range.

What are the major differences between versions?

Each version has a distinct sound, due to things like what components are used on the inside and different features, like extra switches. You’ll also find different versions have color or design variations to the front face design of the pedal. Internal component changes happened regularly in the early days—even within the same version class—and with older pedals, transistors and resistors tend to sag and change values over time. This all means that no two vintage Muffs are going to sound the same, which, for many, only adds to the allure of hunting down the right one.

Why are some Big Muffs more expensive than others?

First, there’s a basic supply and demand with vintage pedals. While there are many Big Muffs in the world, there are very few, say, Big Muff V1 Triangle pedals in existence, which drives up the prices. Adding to this sense of demand are different versions' association with famous players, such as David Gilmour's use of Big Muff V2 (often called the “Ram’s Head” on Comfortably Numb and other songs).

The Vintage Muffs You Need To Know

The Often-Imitated Big Muff Circuit

In the pantheon of guitar pedals (and of tone in general), the Big Muff is one of the most ubiquitous fuzz circuits. Boutique pedal makers have often used the Big Muff circuit as a canvas on which to paint their own interpretations.

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