The Most Popular Guitar Combo Amps on Reverb

The most popular guitar combo amps on Reverb, updated daily.

Guitar amps come and all shapes and sizes, and for most players, a combo amp—that is, an amp with everything in one unit rather than separated head and speaker cabinet—is the best bet. There are thousands of different guitar combo amp models out there in the world, with new models coming to market every year.

On this page, you'll see an up-to-date ranking of the most popular options currently on Reverb based on real-time transaction data from our marketplace. Take a look at the most popular combo amps available today in the space below, and click on the images to learn more about each option and find your own on Reverb.

What to Consider When Buying a Combo Amp

Wattage

The watts largely decide how loud your combo can get and should be considered based on application. Just need a practice amp for the apartment? Anything under 10 watts will suit your needs like the Orange Crush Mini or Vox AC10C1 Custom. (Side note: small amps are also studio favorites for their focused tone). If you want to play shows, you'll need anything 15 watts and up from the 22-watt Fender '65 Deluxe Reverb Reissue to the brawny Mesa Boogie .50 Caliber 50-watt combo.

Speaker Size

The size of a combo's speakers also plays a role in how loud it can be, but it's also a deciding factor in the combo's frequency range. Smaller sizes like 8" and 10" emphasize more treble and focus with less volume, while on the other end, a 15" speaker sits in the bass range with more volume but less definition. A 12" speaker hits a sweet spot between highs and lows and is thus found in many combos.

Digital Features

Many modern combos sport an onboard suite of digital features which can be an ideal option for players after an all-in-one solution. Picks like the Boss Katana series get you both built-in digital effects ranging from reverb and delay to spacey modulation as well as classic amp voices that emulate vintage tweed twang and searing British gain.

Portability

If you're playing a lot of gigs, it's worth considering an amp that won't throw your back out from lugging it in and out of the van. Generally, tube amplifiers are heavier and therefore more of a pain to lug around, but if you're a tone purist, the analog sound might be worth it. If you're curious about the digital realm, new advances in DSP technology like the Fender Tone Master Deluxe Reverb get big sound, a solid recreation of organic warmth, and an amp that's easy to carry.

Used Combo Amps on Reverb Right Now

Learn More About Guitar Amp Combos